Using GitHub “Viewed” Checkbox

I’ve been using GitHub for years now, but I hadn’t really taken advantage of the “Viewed” checkbox on the right side of the file listing while reviewing PRs until a teammate pointed it out to me and mentioned its usefulness beyond indicating simply that the file had been viewed. It turns out that if you …

Older iPhone Simulators and macOS Catalina

The other evening, in the wake of a bit of nostalgia, I tested running an emulator project on an iPhone 5 simulator running iOS 10.3 in Xcode 11 (more on that in a future podcast episode). It surprised me at the time—but it probably shouldn’t have—that I got the notorious “‘App Name’ has not been …

Enums and CaseIterable in Swift

In your journeys with Swift since 4.2 released, you may have seen the CaseIterable protocol when working with enums. Since this is a relatively new language feature in 4.2, you might wonder what that is or what it does. In this article on raywenderlich.com, Getting to Know Enum, Struct and Class Types in Swift, Adam …

The Curious Case of Audiobooks on iOS and macOS

I don’t use Audible (yet), but the situation regarding Audiobooks on macOS Mojave and iOS 12 feels a bit like a UX conundrum at the very least. For starters, the Audiobooks feature resides in iTunes on macOS, but it’s in Books on iOS. I understand arguments for both, but it feels like Apple’s design or …

How To Configure Charles Proxy to Debug SSL Connections from iOS Apps

If you’re doing extensive debugging and introspection with your web APIs (or perhaps debugging Web Views), here’s how to configure Charles to proxy SSL connections from the Simulator and on-device: SSL connections from within iPhone applications • Charles Web Debugging Proxy As of Charles v3.9.3 there is an item in the Help menu, “Install Charles …

Handy Swift Resource: Hacking With Swift’s Auto Layout Cheat Sheet

This is a pretty great one-stop-shopping resource for Auto Layout by Paul Hudson. The Auto Layout cheat sheet – Hacking with Swift Auto Layout is a powerful tool for creating flexible, maintainable rules for your user interface. It can also be a real brain vortex if you’re unlucky – it’s something that makes hard things …

When Worlds Collide: How to call complex Objective-C selectors from Swift

When developing in Swift, you will eventually need to interact with Objective-C APIs. Most of the time this is fine, and fairly straightforward to do using #selector. However, every once in a while you will need to invoke an Objective-C selector that you did not write (usually when the selector is part of the iOS …