Ridiculous. I was staring at Visual Studio 2013 in disbelief, looking at the empty Toolbox thinking I missed an installation step, even though all the other functionality of SQL Server Integration Services (SSIS) was working just fine. After doing a little digging (this time Stack Overflow did not help), it turns out that SSIS has its own dedicated Toolbox, and it’s basically hidden. Thanks to an article by Robert Bigec, the answer is pretty simple, but not obvious. The Empty Toolbox – SSIS 2012 | Robert’s Spout.ToString() I stared at this toolbox in disbelief. White and spacious with a confirming message that gave me no comfort: “There are no usable controls in here … “. What happened to the Source[…]

OK this REALLY made me do a facepalm. I was wresting again with SSRS (Microsoft’s SQL Server Reporting Services), and was just trying to format the numbers in a pie chart. It seemed clear enough: right click on the little numbers in the pie chart and edit the number format. It even displays all the numbers in all the pie slices with the new format. Easy, right? No. That change only affects the first series, with no obvious way of selecting the other series values to format them… since they look like they’re already formatted! [image here…] Turns out you have to move the next series to the top position in the “Chart Data” floating tool window, and then you can modify the[…]

Thanks to a tip in this video by Cocoa Samurai/Colin Wheeler: Distributed Version Control with Git on Vimeo: This is a screencast based off a talk I gave to the Des Moines Cocoaheads group. In this talk I tried to show why you should switch from Centralized Version Control, what is wrong with Subversion and what git does well. Check out Part II when I demonstrate Git and some apps available on Mac OS X to help you get the most out of git. …you can configure File Merge to be used by default by Git version control system: git config –global merge.tool opendiff Haven’t tried it yet but it’s a great tip and I’m looking forward to implementing it[…]

Seems that I occasionally need to trigger the postback on an UpdatePanel, and invariably I forget between usages. Since this particular post from Encosia has saved my bacon on more than one occasion, I shall share it here (and for my own future benefit): Easily refresh an UpdatePanel, using JavaScript | Encosia: I’ve noticed a lot of discussion lately regarding methods to refresh an UpdatePanel via client script. This is very easy on the server side, of course. You can just call UpdatePanel.Update(). However, on the client side, the most common solutions I’ve been seeing just don’t feel right. Many will advise you to use a hidden button control inside the UpdatePanel, manipulated via button.click(), to trigger a partial postback[…]

Someone on the ASP.NET forums asked how to set session variables in JavaScript. The answers given ranged from “totally wrong” to “rather misleading” or “marginally helpful”. So in a nutshell, yes, you can totally do it. Not only will you be able to do it, you will love doing it after you get used to the process of getting it set up. Here’s the recipe for success: Add an ASP.NET AJAX ScriptManager to your page. Create a simple ASMX Web service using Visual Studio. Uncomment the Attribute directly above the class definition that reads [System.Web.Script.Services.ScriptService] to enable ASP.NET AJAX to see your web methods. Create a method to get or update data in your session, and make sure the Attribute[…]

30+ Handy Blank Templates for Designers | Creative Repository: Sometimes you have a nice concept for a design in your mind, but you don’t know where to start; or sometimes you are just not aware of the right size for the design to implement. That’s where templates come handy. I have collected some very useful templates with proper guidelines, sizes and resolutions for design projects like business cards, letterheads, vinyl designs, brochures etc. I believe that these will prove to be a great time-saver for many of you guys. Most of these are in PSD or AI format, and are easily editable. Hope you find them useful.

I had run into this problem before. Setup I have my Visual Studio 2008 options set to reload the previously loaded solution on startup. I use Subversion. I use AnkhSVN as my SVN provider in Visual Studio 2008. Problem If I launched Visual Studio 2008 with a particular solution loaded when I last closed VS, I would receive a “Source control provider could not be found” error. However… if I just launched it via double-clicking on the .SLN file in my file system, no error!!! Weird. OK – so I did a quick diff on a solution that I knew worked fine. Both had the expected source control provider information embedded: SccProjectName = “Svn” SccAuxPath = “Svn” SccLocalPath = “Svn”[…]