React Navigation for React Native is “collaboration between people from Facebook, Exponent and the React community at large” as this comment on the project’s GitHub page indicates: React Navigation is born from the React Native community’s need for an extensible yet easy-to-use navigation solution. It replaces and improves upon several navigation libraries in the ecosystem, including Ex-Navigation, React Native’s Navigator and NavigationExperimental components. React Navigation can also be used across React and React Native projects allowing for a higher degree of shared code. Once stable, NavigationExperimental will be deprecated in favor of React Navigation. React Navigation is a collaboration between people from Facebook, Exponent and the React community at large. Also interesting is the revealing that React Native’s NavigationExperimental will[…]

If you’re a TextWrangler user and you wanted to be able to format a block of JSON, you can do it yourself by following the instructions at Java Dev on Mac OS X: Format JSON in TextWrangler 1. Create text (Python) file called “Format JSON” in the following location: ~/Library/Application Support/TextWrangler/Text Filters/Format JSON.py 2. Add the following Python code to take care of the formatting: #!/usr/local/bin/python import fileinput import json if __name__ == “__main__”: text = ” for line in fileinput.input(): text = text + ‘ ‘ + line.strip() jsonObj = json.loads(text) print json.dumps(jsonObj, sort_keys=True, indent=2) One thing that tripped me up is that you need to select a block of text before running the macro. Otherwise it works great.[…]

Good tip from iOS Developer Tips for using the “Related Files” button in the upper left corner of your code window (right next to the Back/Forward navigation buttons): Xcode 4 : Related Files List With Xcode 4 you can quickly access an assortment of files related to your project through the Related Files option in the Jump Bar.  

This sounds like it could really be a problem for developers who store anything but truly temporary data in the Caches or tmp directory… Cleaning… – Marco.org Every iOS app has its own “home” directory where it can store files. Every file and directory that an app puts there, except anything in a Caches or tmp directory, gets backed up when you sync your device to iTunes. Prior to iOS 5, the system never deleted the contents of Caches and tmp, so they were safe places for apps to put data that should always be available but could be redownloaded if the user did a complete restore or otherwise lost all data, and therefore shouldn’t be taking up space in[…]

Recently, I was having an issue I was having with subviews added to my UIButton objects that I was customizing. The buttons would behave fine if they were standard rounded rect buttons, but the moment I added a UIView and some UILabels to it, the taps stopped responding. But I was able to resolve it, thanks to the tip provided here: iPhone: Subviews in UIButtons block the touch, unless… The solution boils down to something very simple and it makes sense when you think about it, but at first it seems strange: All you need to do is set userInteractionEnabled and exclusiveTouch to NO on the items that you want to add as subviews to your UIButton (and don’t set those properties[…]

Thought this was an interesting post from the idevblogaday feed: Old School Code Review – Pen & Paper: Old School Code Review – Pen & Paper Every once in a while when I get to a certain point in a project, I like to back up and make sure I’m not missing the forest for the trees. That’s when I print out a lot of code and head for the coffee shop.

One of the more annoying things about iOS is its notification system. Modal alerts are so arcane, intrusive and annoying, I am actually shocked that they are still the standard method of notification in iOS as of version 4… Looks like there are some underground movements (requiring jailbreaking, of course) to change that. Here’s a little commentary by Sebastiaan de With (@cocoia) that I found interesting: Cocoia Blog » Getting Notified: There’s some discussion on Apple-centric and tech news websites about a video that’s doing the rounds with a new approach to notifications for iOS. While the system in the video is really nothing new (there’s been at least one alternative notification system in the App-Store-for-jailbroken-phones “Cydia” since 2010) it[…]

It was time to clean house a bit, so I wanted to remove all the currently installed applications in the iPhone Simulator. Turns out there’s a very simple way to do it… 1. With the iPhone Simulator running, click on the iOS Simulator application menu. 2. Click “Reset Contents and Settings…”. – A confirmation dialog will appear warning that “all installed applications, content, and settings will be moved to the trash.” 3. Click “Reset.” All the applications will be removed and you can proceed with a clean slate.

The other day I was attempting to build and test a simple example Phonegap application for Android on my Windows box. Unfortunately, I was unable to successfully execute the “droidgap” call using ruby and Git Bash. It would kinda build out a structure and then would bomb when attempting to build out the .jar file. Thankfully, Stack Overflow to the rescue (again)! phonegap android sample project not building – Stack Overflow The important point is that, evidently, the droidgap build script needed to call “ant.bat” on Windows (as opposed to just “ant”). This was even with the path to ant set in my PATH environment variable. Thanks again, Stack Overflow. No, the Tools are Not Free. Just as a commentary,[…]