An interesting thing happened while doing routine runs of Analyze in Xcode 4.2. I was able to track down and solve all of the memory issues that Analyze was reporting except for one, and for the life of my I couldn’t figure out what was wrong with this code: if (![self.newBlahBlahBlah isEqualToString:anotherString]) { //… }   Then, i happened upon this thread on StackOverflow: Objective-C – NSString copy property memory management – Stack Overflow “Figured out what was wrong. I used the property name newFoo which made the compiler think I returned a new object. So note to self: understand cocoa naming conventions.” …and then it clicked: the property “newBlahBlahBlah” was basically a violation of convention, and was tripping up[…]

Every once in a while, there’s a feature in Objective-C that I really appreciate — the kind of method that makes you think, “Yes! Of course that should be in there!”, but yet at the same time it is surprising, because because in the past I would pretty much always have to roll my own algorithm for dealing with the particular problem. The instance of this that I had in mind is with regard to the lastPathComponent method of NSString. It is so convenient to be able to just get the name of a file from a path just by doing the following: NSString* fileName = [myPath lastPathComponent]; In the past, on other platforms and languages, I typically had to[…]

Just started experimenting with KIF and found this article by Stuart Gleadow, which provides a rundown on UI automation testing tools for iOS: Which Automated iOS Testing Tool To Use – Stewart Gleadow’s Blog It seems obvious that Apple really needs to build a tool (something better than UI Automation) that is easy to create & manage tests, which can also be deployed and run in a Continuous Integration environment. In the meantime, KIF looks like an interesting alternative…